Recent updates to guidelines from the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology changed the definition of high blood pressure or hypertension for most people. High blood pressure is now generally defined as 130 or higher for the first number, or 80 or higher for the second number (previously it was 140/90). However, there are important considerations for older adults in deciding whether to start treatment for high blood pressure, including other health conditions and overall fitness. If your blood pressure is above 130/80, your doctor will evaluate your health to determine what treatment is needed to balance risks and benefits in your particular situation.

Exercise. Doctors recommend at least 150 minutes per week of exercise to help reduce blood pressure. Brisk walking is excellent for reducing blood pressure and improving overall cardiovascular health, but other exercises can work too. Try jogging, riding a bike, swimming, dancing, or interval training to get your aerobic exercise. Strength training is also important to your heart health and can help reduce blood pressure.
My husband went into the local hospital on Thursday with a continuance of lightnheadedness and very shakey legs. Three hours after arriving at the ER. He was totally unable to swing his legs up into the bed or move them. He was given injections of steroids and admitted. Original diagnosis was inflammation of the lower back. He was given a little insulin to counteract the steroids (and my husband is not a diabetic).
Once the diagnosis of hypertension has been made, healthcare providers should attempt to identify the underlying cause based on risk factors and other symptoms, if present. Secondary hypertension is more common in preadolescent children, with most cases caused by kidney disease. Primary or essential hypertension is more common in adolescents and has multiple risk factors, including obesity and a family history of hypertension.[83] Laboratory tests can also be performed to identify possible causes of secondary hypertension, and to determine whether hypertension has caused damage to the heart, eyes, and kidneys. Additional tests for diabetes and high cholesterol levels are usually performed because these conditions are additional risk factors for the development of heart disease and may require treatment.[6]
Hypertension is present in many people who are unaware they have this disorder. Hypertension is called a silent killer because too often the first symptom of the disease is a heart attack or stroke. To prevent this, get outside in nature and exercise, enjoy the flowers, and let nature provide a calming respite in life. Also, get regular medical checkups. If hypertension symptoms hypertension arise, seek immediate medical care. Call 911 immediately if someone has passed out unexpectedly.
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